Shades of Pet-Friendly

dogs, travel, Uncategorized

Lucy at sunset, Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin

Fayston, Vermont. In my last post, I wrote about my upcoming road trip with dog Lucy and my college-age son to visit my parents in the Midwest. The trip involved crossing the US-Canadian border and hotel stays in several different locations. The trip went well, most of the time. Here’s what I found:

Border Crossings
My research told me that I needed to bring Lucy’s health and rabies shot records, $30 to pay the Canadian fee crossing into Canada, and her food in its original bag so that the ingredients could be easily determined. What actually happened is that I was not asked about the dog at all. No fee collected. No need to show health papers. No search to determine food ingredients. Most of the border agents’ questions were regarding weapons, which I did not bring. I didn’t even bring my golf clubs or a fishing rod. We enjoyed unremarkable crossings.

Having Lucy along likely made the crossings easier.  On our return across the border into Vermont, the United States agent asked the usual questions in the usual no-nonsense-just-the-facts-ma’am manner. Until he asked me to roll down the back seat window and met Lucy. His face morphed into a giant relaxed smile as he reached into our car to pet Lucy. Lucy wagged with excitement. “Welcome home,” he said and waved us through. As we drove off, he shouted: “I love Lucy!”

Lodging
I made most of our hotel arrangements well ahead of our trip.  I searched for pet-friendly hotels, and Best Western made it easy with most locations listed as such. I also used BringFido.com, through which I found a boutique hotel, the Old Stone Inn, in Niagara Falls, Ontario for our first night.

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The Old Stone Inn’s courtyard

I highly recommend The Old Stone Inn in Niagara Falls, on the Canadian side.  Lucy was warmly welcomed with a special gift of a travel dog dish, treats, and souvenir door hanger.  The room was large and the beds were deemed “the most comfortable ever” by my son.  We were allowed to leave Lucy in the room – I had brought her crate – while we walked around the falls.  We ate a delicious supper of burgers and local brews from the hotel’s pub in the attractive courtyard. The hotel’s location was ideal: just a short walk down a wooded path to the falls. The hotel was charming and the staff was friendly.  We were off to a great start!

 

After a long day of driving, we made it to Indiana, where I had made a reservation in a Best Western just off of I-80 near Chicago. Pet-friendly meant something else here. Upon arrival, I was asked to sign a pet agreement, part of which was to have our room inspected by a maid before we were allowed to check out. Dogs were not supposed to be left alone in the room, but when I said I had a crate, they didn’t press the point. We were tired and didn’t want to leave the room that evening anyway. Where would we go? Instead, we devoured a delivered pizza and enjoyed local brews from the hotel bar. We could hear another small dog barking all evening and into the night (wonder if the dog was left in the room alone?) but luckily Lucy did not bark in return. The maid was afraid of Lucy, but we passed inspection.

After several days staying at my mom’s house, we were back in the car headed to Sturgeon Bay, in Door County, Wisconsin and another Best Western to meet up with my dad and step-mom. Again, I was presented with the dog agreement at check-in, but this time the staff person was adamant that I do not leave the dog in the room alone, under any circumstances – not even to go to breakfast, which was included in our room fee. No maid inspection requirement at this property, however.

I was flustered and frustrated. My dad and step-mom were staying in the same hotel – that was the point. We planned to stay three nights. I was not told of the pet policy details when I made my reservations through the Best Western central reservation toll-free number, and I didn’t know what to ask at the time. But not being able to leave Lucy for a few hours was not going to work with the activities my family wanted to do. Add to that, we were assigned a room right next to the pool and the breakfast room. Bacon smells, kid noise, and water splashing sounds and they expect my golden retriever to not bark?! I canceled the last two nights and plugged in my computer to find another hotel.

Using the pet-friendly filter at Expedia.com, I found a room at The White Birch Inn. The room’s decor was something of a marvel, locked in the late 1980’s-early 1990’s, with mauve carpeting and wallpaper borders. But I would be allowed to leave Lucy in the room if I left my cell number. At check-in, I was given a token for a free drink from the bar. Breakfast was continental, and the first day, I enjoyed a bowl of beautiful fresh berries. The room was large and clean, and the price was right.

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Lucy in front of one of the many murals in Sudbury, Ontario.  The murals are created as part of an annual music and art festival.

Our last night of the trip was also in a Best Western in Sudbury, Ontario. The hotel is located on the same street as the police station and across the street from a small park. Again I was given a pet policy form to sign upon arrival, but leaving the dog in our 5th-floor room while we went to breakfast on the first floor was o.k. Or we could go just about anywhere else, as long as no one complained about the dog barking. The desk manager laughed when I told her about the room inspection clause I encountered in Indiana. As Best Westerns are independently owned, she explained, the pet policy (and its enforcement) varies from property to property.

 

The Lodging Upshot
Smaller inns will likely have more generous pet policies. It takes a bit more time to comb through search sites and requires a few extra telephone calls to find a good fit. Know what you are going to be doing helps filter, too – the Sturgeon Bay Best Western would have been fine if we had planned to be out all day hiking with Lucy.

Be prepared to pay a small additional fee for each pet. Fees were well-disclosed during the reservation process. Some hotels have a size limit for the pet, so pay attention to that detail if you have a large dog.

Food & Play Finding dog-friendly casual dining was pretty easy. We found several restaurants that welcomed dogs at their outdoor seating areas. Culver’s, a Wisconsin favorite with locations also in Minnesota and in Michigan, even had water bowls set out for four-legged guests. Try the cheese curds… In Sturgeon Bay, we ate dinner outside on the water at Waterfront Mary’s and Sonny’s. We also enjoyed take-out and either ate in the hotel or sat in a public park that allows dogs.

If you go to Door County, Wisconsin, be sure to visit the dog beach at Whitefish Dunes State Park. A day pass cost us $11 for the car, which we paid for at the ranger station. We enjoyed an afternoon on a beautiful, clean, sandy beach on the shores of Lake Michigan. Lucy swam and swam and swam.

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Lucy at Alimagnet Dog Park, Burnsville, Minnesota

When visiting a new town, check local community websites to find dog parks and leash laws. The town where my mom lives has a big dog park, Alimagnet Dog Park, with a pond for dog swimming and a walking path. The park is fenced, so dogs are free to be off-leash. Plus, dogs are allowed off leash during the warm months in all of the town’s outdoor hockey rinks with a gate. My mom lives in hockey-crazy Minnesota – a lot of off leash spaces!

 

While bringing Lucy made the trip more difficult in some ways – and certainly created a problem for our family visit in Door County – it also made it easier to meet people. Lucy basked in all of the extra attention as people of all ages told me delightful stories about their dog “at home.”

My morning walks with Lucy were quiet times to explore and wander. I found some of the murals in Sudbury, Ontario while my son was still sleeping. I watched the sun rise over the ball field where I used to play as a kid. While walking Lucy at dawn along Niagara Falls, I met a man from Michigan who told me about his dog, a 130 lb. chocolate lab. Named “Fudge.”

I want to meet Fudge.

Note: The manager at the Sturgeon Bay, WI Best Western did pay me a visit the next morning and offered to let me keep the dog in the room unattended, but it was too late at that point as we were already packing up to go to the White Birch Inn.

Images, below: Lucy at Whitefish Dunes State Park; Fire tower in Sturgeon Bay and a view from it; Sturgeon Bay waterfront and drawbridge; white thistle that is rare and specific to the Whitefish Dunes area; Lucy on the dog beach of Lake Michigan; Spoon Bridge and Cherry with Minneapolis skyline; Minnehaha Falls, Minneapolis, Minnesota; Sebastian Joe’s, Minneapolis; chillin’ with my pal Snoops at Valleyfair, Shakopee, Minnesota; Niagara Falls from the Canadian side; and Lucy at Niagara Falls at dawn.

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And away we go

dogs, travel, Uncategorized
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Lucy studies the map.

Fayston, Vermont. For the first time in many years, my summer calendar is OPEN. Blank spaces for days and days. No work, at least not much. No events. At least none that I HAD to attend. No obligations. At least none that I’m aware. So when my mom asked me to visit her back home in Minnesota instead of her flying East, I said o.k.

What if I drove? I posed this question out loud one evening last March when my son was home from college. He said if I drove, he’d go, too. What? Really?! He said we could take our cameras and make a road trip out of it. Over the next several weeks, I kept asking him if he still wanted to go. I expected he’d think about all those hours in the car with mom and change his mind. He didn’t.

Well, you can’t leave me with three dogs all that time, said my husband. I can’t take them all to work with me.

Which one don’t you want to take to work? I asked. Lucy was his answer.

So now my trip home is a two-week road trip with my son Erik and dog Lucy on a route that will take us through Niagra Falls and a bit of Ontario. After several days with mom in Minnesota, Lucy, Erik and I will meet up with my dad and stepmom in Door County, Wisconsin before looping back through Ontario then Montreal, Quebec, then home to Vermont. I used the on-line AAA TripTik route planner, which made the task very simple.

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Sorry, Charlie. I will miss you terribly – we’ll Facetime! And you’ll have lots of fun with Linus. I’ll miss Linus, too.  Lucy’s not nearly as good of a lap dog.

Preparations have preoccupied me for weeks. I researched and read Canadian and U.S. information about crossing the border with a dog: Dogs must be in good health and a rabies certificate from the vet must be presented to the border agent along with payment of a $30 fee. I coordinated our plans with my parents, finalized our route, and then made hotel reservations at pet-friendly places that welcome bigger dogs. I also needed to attend to other travel details: obtaining a copy Lucy’s vet records (that was easy – thank you Dr. Roy’s office); arranging an oil change for my car; emptying a ridiculous amount of old photo files from my computer to make room for new photo files; changing some money so I have Canadian funds to pay the pet fee at the border; and shopping for a new pair of sneakers.

The car is packed. My camera battery is fully charged. And away we go!

I will post a photo gallery from our trip in next month’s article here on wagmorevt.com. For daily road trip photos, please follow me, @skimor, on Instagram!

Wagmorevt is two!

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Fayston, Vermont.  Thank you for following along with our adventures in the Green Mountains of Vermont.  To celebrate our second year of wagmorevt, here’s a video slideshow of some of the best of last year’s photos. Enjoy!

For daily photos, please follow me on Instagram @skimor, or search #wagmorevt.

If you have a comment to share or would like your dog to be featured (if you’re within 50 miles of the Mad River Valley in Vermont, I’ll come to you), please fill out the contact form, below.  

 

Love Notes

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Lucy brings a big gift. Size matters...

Lucy brings a big gift. Size matters…

Fayston, Vermont.  Pretty much every day is Valentine’s Day when you have a dog. Here are seven ways they celebrate their love for you all year long:

  1.  They are always happy to see you. Even if you’ve only been gone two minutes, they are there, wagging. They greet you with a kiss. Many wet, sloppy kisses.

2. They want to be with you. Even if the bank didn’t give out treats, they want to go for a ride with you. Also, they want to make sure you are o.k. when you go to the bathroom.

3. They protect you by sounding the bark alarm. Squirrels and other rodents who wander too close receive a thorough scolding. Sometimes they even alert you when it’s windy outside.

Charlie Brown is a happy runner.

Charlie Brown runs happy.

4. They make sure you get some exercise. Every day. They remind you when it’s time to take a walk, and become really, really excited when you put on your BIG boots.

5. They make sure you take time for play. They interrupt computer time by bringing a ball. They grab a stick from the woodpile and make you chase them to take it away.

6. They bring you gifts. Sometimes it’s a stick (or several) for the wood stove, other times it’s something they’ve fetched from the trash. (They don’t have a problem with regifting.) Some dogs even bring you socks to make sure you go outside. (See number 4.)

7. They keep you close. They use you for a pillow. The larger the dog, the more lap they need. Even if you’re not all that big. If you leave the house, they hop the doggy gate to sleep on your bed. On your pillow, so you can share dreams. They leave traces of their love on all your clothing, especially your favorite black sweater – it’s their favorite, too!

I hope you celebrate your dog’s love by making sure you take a nice, long walk and spend time with them. Every day. That’s all they want. Well, some cookies would be nice, too.

Linus

Linus

 

P.s. Be sure to follow me on Instagram @skimor for daily photo posts!

I’d love to hear from you! If you want to leave me a love note;), or have any comments or questions, please use the form, below.

Squad coaching

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The Squad: Lucy, Charlie Brown, and Linus

Fayston, Vermont. Linus can’t catch. He becomes so excited at the thought that food is coming his way that he misses the toss. Every time. Unless he’s lucky. His consistency in missing is remarkable.

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Linus on the hunt.

On New Year’s Eve, we took a short romp in the woods after I came home from a day of teaching skiing.  Once inside, I rewarded each dog with a small dog cookie.  Linus missed the tossed treat, as usual. The treat bounced off his nose, sailed through the air then slid across the floor coming to rest underneath the refrigerator. Linus excitedly tried to pry it loose as I watched, amused. Then I thought, what if Linus becomes stuck, too?  Dr. Roy would have another story to tell, but I’m sure I won’t like the bill. I reached into the cookie jar and pushed another cookie across the floor for Linus, which he hurriedly tracked down and gobbled up.

Meanwhile, Charlie Brown took Linus’ place at the refrigerator, trying to dislodge the cookie. After a few futile seconds, Charlie stopped. He sat down and looked up at me. “Can you help, please,” said his large thought bubble. I knelt down, removed the stuck treat, and handed it to Charlie.

Lucy stood by me, watching. Lucy is my star fielder. She catches everything tossed her way. Lucy is just as thrilled to catch a snowball as a carrot. Her movements are athletic and acrobatic: She seems to simply enjoy leaping. She radiates pure joy when she shags anything thrown for her.

I thought of how each of my dogs approaches a problem differently and the success of each technique. With the new calendar year beginning, I’ve been reflecting and planning. I also begin a new job this week. A lot of new things will be tossed my way.

Linus has shown me that it is exciting to be goal-oriented, but to be successful, one needs to slow down a bit. And, sometimes one needs a second chance. Charlie pointed out that it’s o.k. to ask for help after giving the task a good try.

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Lucy shagging a snowball.

As for Lucy, she reminds me to enjoy the leaping.

Special thanks to Lisa Loomis and The Valley Reporter for the lovely profile article about wagmorevt.com in the December 28, 2016, issue. ICYMI, read the article by clicking here: The Valley’s own dog blog

A neighbor comes to call

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Fayston, Vermont. Barking woke me up. Linus and Charlie were sounding the alarm downstairs, loudly. I looked at my bedside clock: 11:30. Probably a mouse or maybe a raccoon on the deck. I’m not going downstairs. Charlie spooks easily and Linus barks at the t.v. The visitor will move on, then the dogs will quiet, I told myself as I pulled the pillow over my ears.

The barking became even more frenzied, joined by a third voice. A low, deep, measured bark under the alarm bells. Lucy. Golden retriever who’s never met a stranger Lucy. Hers was not an alarm, but a call for back-up.

I made my way in the dark, down the stairs as fast as my arthritic joints would allow, switched on the outside light, and shrieked with surprise. I was standing a few feet away from A BEAR.

We looked at each other through the window, the bear blinking at me in the sudden light. I took in its beautiful, thick, glossy coat and healthy, bright eyes. It was full-grown but young. Probably the same one who left prints on the driveway recently. A leaf was dangling from its mouth like salad interrupted. I wanted to reach through the glass to touch its head and brush away the food from its face.

“What is it?” my husband finally called down from upstairs.

“A bear,” I softly replied, not wanting it to run away just yet.

“Big or little?”

That’s a ridiculous question, I thought. Instead, I answered “In-between?”

Footsteps down the bedroom stairs broke the spell. The bear plodded around our emerging herb garden and ran into the trees at the back of our yard. (The dogs are not as polite – they run straight through the garden.) We could still see the bear in the shadows cast by the outside light.

My husband returned to bed. I waited a long while before I went on the deck to close the gate. I brought inside the Brussel sprouts awaiting transplant. One of the plants had definitely been nibbled, but the others were untouched.

I guess bears don’t like Brussel sprouts.

bearEd. note: Our house borders on state land. When we bought the house about six years ago, the sellers told us we’d have a moose and bears. We were not concerned as we were coming from New Jersey, where the bears are big, sometimes aggressive, and love throwing pool parties. Since we moved in, I’ve seen a bear on the road a few times, but not close to the house. In the yard, I’ve seen an ermine, an eight-point buck, and all sorts of rodents and birds. Plus a variety of reptiles and amphibians. Linus met a porcupine once, but that’s another story. Where the driveway meets the road, I’ve seen a family of fishers, a doe and twin fawns, turkeys, and a coyote. Still waiting to see a moose.

On a walk a few days after the visit, I smiled as I followed familiar bear tracks down the middle of the road. The footprints made wilderness-styled street markings drawn in the dirt, a message left by my neighbor.