Fostering family

RS_bella_franolsen_4317_IMG_1550

Bella

Duxbury, Vermont
With Fran Olsen, volunteer and foster extraordinaire for Golden Huggs Rescue (GHR), and her dogs Bella and Lucy.  We have always been a two dog family. When we lost one of our oldies, we needed to have another dog – we always need to have two. We started looking and looking, and I applied to Golden Huggs. Amy [GHR volunteer] came and did my home visit, and she convinced me to foster with intent to adopt. I didn’t know about that foster thing… but I agreed.

That first foster worked out fine because my son Matthew ended up adopting her. It was a huge litter. There was about eight or nine of them that came from Tennessee. That was seven or eight years ago.

We’ve done 15 fifteen fosters. Bella is our foster failure.  I think every foster has at least one foster failure – one comes through the door that you know is staying… We picked her up in Richmond. She was part of a whole litter that came up in Brigitte’s [GHR founder Brigitte Ritchie] car. When I saw Bella, I said to Brigitte “That’s not fair.” Bella’s now about 6.

And then from there, Golden Huggs had a lot of dogs and a lot of vetting, and was robbing Peter to pay Paul. I called Laura Howe [a GHR volunteer and organizer] to say we needed to do something. Selling t-shirts wasn’t cutting it. So we put our heads together and came up with Party for the Pups, which we did for five years. It was a lot of work, and as time went on, we found that the new type of adopters is of a different mindset than the party and drink and dance type we had in the early years. Now they are more the outdoorsy type, so we need to change up our [fundraising] activity. We’re thinking we’ll do a big yard sale mid-summer. Collette’s Furniture – a big supporter of GHR – has offered to host it at the store. [The yard sale fundraiser is still in the planning stage, so please check the GHR site in the coming weeks for details.]

RS_Lucy_franolsen_4317_IMG_1567

Lucy

Lucy is not a Golden Huggs dog, but she is a rescue. I went into Pet Food Warehouse to get supplies, and some arbitrary rescue – I couldn’t tell you the name of it – had a pen in the middle of the store. I walked by and thought “That one’s cute.”  I felt like she was watching me walk down the aisles all through the store.

I tried to call my husband, but he was off snowmobiling with a buddy and didn’t answer and didn’t answer. So I said “C’mon.” She jumped right into the front seat of the car and I said “Lucy, we’re in trouble. We have some ’splaining to do.”

The adoption lady was really nice and told me to call her if the dog didn’t get along with our old dog or if my husband was mad, and that I could bring her back. When my husband first met Lucy, he picked her up and that was the end of that. We’ve had her for about 10 years.

Lucy isn’t a lover of big dogs or older dogs, so we foster only puppies. Lucy teaches them. A lot of people don’t like to do puppies because they think they’re too much work. But I bring [the puppy] with me everywhere.

And, my husband loves the fostering. He calls it “test-driving puppies.”

RS_BellaLucy_franolsen_4317_IMG_1553

Bella & Lucy

Editor’s note: The Mad River Valley has many active rescue groups with beautiful pets that need loving homes. Some of these organizations and their volunteers have been previously featured in wagmorevt.com. We so happened to have adopted all three of our dogs from Golden Huggs Rescue, beginning with our Lucy. Laura Howe was Linus’ foster mom. Charlie Brown is our “foster fail.” I first met Fran several years ago at the Party for the Pups fundraiser for Golden Huggs Rescue. The GHR adoption network has become a community that grows with every adoption.

To learn more about Golden Huggs Rescue, please visit their website at www.goldenhuggs.org.

If you have any comments about this post or questions for wagmorevt.com, please share them in the reply box, below, or contact me via email at silvernaildesign@gmail.com.

 

 

Wagmorevt is two!

RS_IMG_1142.jpg

Fayston, Vermont.  Thank you for following along with our adventures in the Green Mountains of Vermont.  To celebrate our second year of wagmorevt, here’s a video slideshow of some of the best of last year’s photos. Enjoy!

For daily photos, please follow me on Instagram @skimor, or search #wagmorevt.

If you have a comment to share or would like your dog to be featured (if you’re within 50 miles of the Mad River Valley in Vermont, I’ll come to you), please fill out the contact form, below.  

 

Love Notes

Lucy brings a big gift. Size matters...

Lucy brings a big gift. Size matters…

Fayston, Vermont.  Pretty much every day is Valentine’s Day when you have a dog. Here are seven ways they celebrate their love for you all year long:

  1.  They are always happy to see you. Even if you’ve only been gone two minutes, they are there, wagging. They greet you with a kiss. Many wet, sloppy kisses.

2. They want to be with you. Even if the bank didn’t give out treats, they want to go for a ride with you. Also, they want to make sure you are o.k. when you go to the bathroom.

3. They protect you by sounding the bark alarm. Squirrels and other rodents who wander too close receive a thorough scolding. Sometimes they even alert you when it’s windy outside.

Charlie Brown is a happy runner.

Charlie Brown runs happy.

4. They make sure you get some exercise. Every day. They remind you when it’s time to take a walk, and become really, really excited when you put on your BIG boots.

5. They make sure you take time for play. They interrupt computer time by bringing a ball. They grab a stick from the woodpile and make you chase them to take it away.

6. They bring you gifts. Sometimes it’s a stick (or several) for the wood stove, other times it’s something they’ve fetched from the trash. (They don’t have a problem with regifting.) Some dogs even bring you socks to make sure you go outside. (See number 4.)

7. They keep you close. They use you for a pillow. The larger the dog, the more lap they need. Even if you’re not all that big. If you leave the house, they hop the doggy gate to sleep on your bed. On your pillow, so you can share dreams. They leave traces of their love on all your clothing, especially your favorite black sweater – it’s their favorite, too!

I hope you celebrate your dog’s love by making sure you take a nice, long walk and spend time with them. Every day. That’s all they want. Well, some cookies would be nice, too.

Linus

Linus

 

P.s. Be sure to follow me on Instagram @skimor for daily photo posts!

I’d love to hear from you! If you want to leave me a love note;), or have any comments or questions, please use the form, below.

Squad coaching

IMG_1566.PNG

The Squad: Lucy, Charlie Brown, and Linus

Fayston, Vermont. Linus can’t catch. He becomes so excited at the thought that food is coming his way that he misses the toss. Every time. Unless he’s lucky. His consistency in missing is remarkable.

linus-in-pursuit-of-happiness

Linus on the hunt.

On New Year’s Eve, we took a short romp in the woods after I came home from a day of teaching skiing.  Once inside, I rewarded each dog with a small dog cookie.  Linus missed the tossed treat, as usual. The treat bounced off his nose, sailed through the air then slid across the floor coming to rest underneath the refrigerator. Linus excitedly tried to pry it loose as I watched, amused. Then I thought, what if Linus becomes stuck, too?  Dr. Roy would have another story to tell, but I’m sure I won’t like the bill. I reached into the cookie jar and pushed another cookie across the floor for Linus, which he hurriedly tracked down and gobbled up.

Meanwhile, Charlie Brown took Linus’ place at the refrigerator, trying to dislodge the cookie. After a few futile seconds, Charlie stopped. He sat down and looked up at me. “Can you help, please,” said his large thought bubble. I knelt down, removed the stuck treat, and handed it to Charlie.

Lucy stood by me, watching. Lucy is my star fielder. She catches everything tossed her way. Lucy is just as thrilled to catch a snowball as a carrot. Her movements are athletic and acrobatic: She seems to simply enjoy leaping. She radiates pure joy when she shags anything thrown for her.

I thought of how each of my dogs approaches a problem differently and the success of each technique. With the new calendar year beginning, I’ve been reflecting and planning. I also begin a new job this week. A lot of new things will be tossed my way.

Linus has shown me that it is exciting to be goal-oriented, but to be successful, one needs to slow down a bit. And, sometimes one needs a second chance. Charlie pointed out that it’s o.k. to ask for help after giving the task a good try.

img_0689

Lucy shagging a snowball.

As for Lucy, she reminds me to enjoy the leaping.

Special thanks to Lisa Loomis and The Valley Reporter for the lovely profile article about wagmorevt.com in the December 28, 2016, issue. ICYMI, read the article by clicking here: The Valley’s own dog blog

Happy Howlidays

rs_wagmorevt_holiday2017

Thank you for following the adventures of my pack and the stories of friends we’ve made along the way.  I am grateful for your support.

If you’d like to see more photos in between blog posts, please follow me on Instagram! My username is @skimor or search the tag #wagmorevt to find my gallery of images.  Most photos are of my dogs, but sometimes I post nature shots. Take a look!

If you’d like to tell your tale here, please use the contact form, below, to set up a meeting.

I wish you the happiest of holidays and all the best in the New Year.

Love,

Rebecca Silbernagel

 

A Better Travel Companion

Waitsfield, Vermont. With the very affectionate Lily, and her people, Tom and Susanne Byrne at Better Travel in the Mad River Green Shopping Center.

Tom: Lily is a three and a half-year-old Goldendoodle.  She came from a breeder in East Montpelier.  We picked her up there, but her breeder’s actually in Pennsylvania.

Tom, Lily, and Susanne at Better Travel in Waitsfield.

Lily helps us in the office every day. She loves being the greeter.  And, she knows when I’m going to the bank: She hears me stamping checks and comes to my desk. She gets a treat when we go to the bank.

On Fridays, she comes with me to buy the Valley Reporter at their office. Roxie [another Goldendoodle, who has has been featured in wagmorevt.com] ignores her, but that Corgi puppy and Lily, they run all over the place, having a grand time!

This is a travel agency. Where are you going to spend the holidays?
Susanne: 
At home! We are looking forward to being together at home, just the three of us.

Editor’s note: Visitors are welcome at Better Travel. Stop by to say “hi” to the Byrnes and especially Lily – she will definitely brighten your day with an enthusiastic greeting. Also, if you have any training to tips to help stop a dog from jumping up on people, please leave them in a comment, below.  My Charlie was a jumper.  I would make him sit, then reward him.  It took some time, but he is (mostly) a reformed jumper now. “Sit” first doesn’t seem to be working very well with Lily – they have asked me to pass along their query to my readers. Lily is super friendly and energetic.  I will share your tips in a future post as well as with Tom and Susanne. Thank you!

 

Piling On The Thanks

Linus on a hike at Mt. Ellen

Linus on a hike at Mt. Ellen

Fayston, Vermont.  I am thankful for Canadian television. Hockey is such a civilized alternative to American politics. Wish Wayne Gretzky had been born in the United States…

Evening couch-nesting – to watch hockey or Law & Order re-runs after an afternoon hike – is a choreographed event with my dogs. I take my place in the corner of the “L” sectional, once the domain of my son who’s away at college. Then Linus puts his head and shoulders on my lap. At about 75 pounds, he’s a big guy who likes hugs and cuddles. Lucy, who weighs a couple of pounds less than Linus, snuggles up against my lower body, her legs entwined with mine and her head on my knees. Charlie Brown, smallest of the pack at 45 pounds, takes up the spot by my feet, or on the cushion next to (and up against) Linus. I feel so lucky, every evening.

I think the dogs are thankful, too.

Take A Hike

Charlie Brown on the trail.

Charlie Brown on the trail.

Fayston, Vermont. Hiking with dogs is something that happens daily at wagmorevt. If you go, here are a few practical tips to make a jaunt into the woods enjoyable and safe:

  1. Bring a trail map. Paper won’t give a low battery warning, but at the very least download a map on your phone. Service can be sketchy in the mountains. Read the map and plan your route before you go. Remember to sign in & out at the trail head, if asked. Always a good idea to let someone know where you’re going.
  2. Don’t head out into a storm. Check the weather. Know what to expect. Plan for the unexpected.
  3. Don’t go hungry. Pack water and a snack. Or two. Don’t feed the bears – don’t litter your snack wrappers. (If you are lucky to see a large creature in the woods, give them plenty of space.)
  4. Chuck T’s are not the best footwear choice. Wear supportive and waterproof shoes or boots and wool socks. The tougher the trail and the more stuff you are carrying (See #1 & 3), the more boot you will need.
  5. Make activity-appropriate wardrobe choices. Cotton t-shirts are best for channel surfing. A techy shirt will be a wicking layer on the way up so you won’t be a hot cold mess at the summit. Bring layers for changes in temperature and weather. Wear bright colors so you can be seen – by hunters and, well, if stuff happens, by rescue teams.
  6. Know the neighborhood. Check to see if hunting is permitted on your route. Avoid times of day when the hunted and hunters are most active, usually dawn and dusk.

    Creamsicle Lucy

    Creamsicle Lucy

  7. Orange is the new black. Put hi-viz colors on your dogs so you can see them and others can, too. (See #6.) Mudd+Wyeth’s Spot-the-Dog products are not only bright but have reflective strips or dots on them, too. (Unpaid endorsement – we use their products.)
  8. Sh*t happens. Pick up after your dog. No one wants to smell that on their shoes. Also, dogs love to roll in all sorts of yucky things. (Charlie Brown is particularly fond of spontaneous mud baths.) Have a towel handy at trail’s end. If the hike involves a drive, bring wet hand wipes for a quick clean-up before hopping in the car.
  9. Obey leash laws. Please. Use a collar and tags with identification and current contact information and/or microchip. This tip is from Captain Obvious, but someone will write me if I leave it off the list.

    Daedalea quercina, I think. If you know what this is, please contact me!

    Daedalea quercina, I think. If you know what this is, please contact me!

  10. Watch where you are going. Listen to the birds, not your headphones. Watch the sun’s position for direction and time clues. Notice the changes in vegetation and rock as you climb. Mind trail markers and enjoy the small details along the way: funky mushrooms and cool moss, hopping toads and crawling orange efts, and the variety of critter tracks. Enjoy the journey, not just reach a destination.

About #10. Last week, I took Lucy and Charlie Brown on our neighborhood loop hike that takes us down a dirt road, through a hayfield, then winds back around and up the hill on a trail in the woods before ending on a gravel drive that connects back to the dirt road and home. It’s about a 3.5-mile trek that is generally pretty easy, but the last half of the wooded trail is probably only used by us and the deer as it’s overgrown in many places. The trail doesn’t have any markers.

Near the end of the wooded trail section, I spotted a new path cut through the underbrush. Curious, I called back Charlie to follow this trail, thinking it linked up with other familiar trails further ahead. Lucy charged ahead to join Charlie as he darted back and forth, flushing grouse from the underbrush. They will sleep well tonight.

The new path turned then headed down a steep hill. Blue square steep. From the sun’s position, I knew I was moving away from home, but I kept descending on the trail. I was enjoying the quiet of the forest and a bit of an adventure. Finally, the path flattened out. A few yards through the trees, I saw a shed and a yard. I wasn’t where I wanted to be. I looked back at the path I just came down. I had to turn around. And climb back up that hill.

“Caw, Caw, Caw, HaHaHa,” laughed a crow, interrupting the quiet. “Very funny,” I replied wryly. I started back up the hill, and Charlie charged ahead once again.

Up, up, up I trudged. Sweating, I stopped to remove two layers down to my short-sleeved golf shirt. I checked my phone: No service. So no directional help. I wasn’t lost, though. I didn’t feel afraid. I knew I simply needed to retrace my steps to where I jumped from my original route, and I had plenty of daylight left. Near the hill’s top, the path went to the left, but Charlie started down an overgrown trail that split to the right. Toward home.

On the trail with Lucy and Charlie Brown.

On the trail with Lucy and Charlie Brown.

The trail was nearly covered by thorny underbrush, but the slender branches gently bent away as I walked through unscratched. Ahead, the sun broke through the canopy, illuminating a patch of bright green ferns on the forest floor. A signal to “go”, I walked to them. The ferns were thigh-high and soft. I ran my fingertips across the tops, like a lazy hand touching the water’s surface from a canoe adrift. The sun felt warm on my face. As I reached the end of the fern patch, I noticed a familiar hand-painted sign nailed to a tree. I will be on the gravel soon, then home.

I have seemingly endless time to hike as I lost my job a few weeks ago. This change in circumstance made me feel a little hurt and naturally angry, but mostly I didn’t know what to do with myself. I began a job search, cleaned my closet then my house, and baked cookies, but I was still feeling anxious and restless. I was lost.

Somewhere in the ferns, I found my way.

Howdy, stranger!

lucy-at-peconic-bay_img_5428

Fayston, Vermont. Last week, my son and I visited some friends who live on the Peconic Bay on the East End of Long Island. We used to have a summer house there, and it is truly my happy place. We hadn’t been back in a few years. Walter decided to stay home and work as he spent the previous week mountain biking with his sister, et al. He kept Charlie and Linus. I took Lucy, who is the only real swimmer of our pack and doesn’t bark much, either – a great trait when neighbors are close by.

We left Vermont with just enough time to take a brief breakfast stop in Randolph, then a pit stop in Connecticut before queuing up for our ferry reservation.  Lucy soaked up the sun on the ferry deck and made many, many friends. Upon arrival at the house, she ran straight into the water, swimming in circles and lapping at the waves she created. Then she pooped. In the water. A GIANT healthy log.

Good thing the tide’s going out, said our host.

As we unpacked, I put out a bowl of fresh water for Lucy. She drank. And drank. I had given her water along the way, but she drained the bowl.

Then she threw up. Mostly water, and some seaweed. (How’d she manage that?) Our host quickly grabbed the mop. Tile floor, thankfully.

Lucy didn’t eat much at all after that. Our host said she was too embarrassed.

Special thanks to our hosts for their good-natured hospitality.